Archdiocese of Santa Fe

Sacramental Policies

THE SACRAMENTS IN GENERAL

BAPTISM

CONFIRMATION

EUCHARIST
 (Reconciliation*)

Marriage**

The following policies were promulgated in 1991 and 1992 by then Archbishop Robert F. Sanchez. Additions and some minor revisions were made by Archbishop Michael J. Sheehan together with the Presbyteral Council in November of 1997, and are included in this updated version of the policies.

PLEASE NOTE:

* There is no separate section for the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Guidelines for First Reconciliation are included in the Eucharist section, #25, #26, #27, #28.

**The Archdiocese of Santa Fe Marriage Policy (1995) is available from the Office of the Marriage Tribunal at the Catholic Center, 831-8177.

For information or clarification of these policies, please contact one of the following:

Office of Religious Education 831-8129

Office of Formation for Christian Service 831-8151

Office of Worship and Christian Initiation 831-8194

Office of Youth, Young Adult, and Campus Ministry 831-8145

 

THE SACRAMENTS IN GENERAL

The Sacraments of the New Testament, instituted by Christ the Lord and entrusted to the Church, as they are actions of Christ and the Church, stand out as the signs and means by which the faith is expressed and strengthened, worship is rendered to God and the sanctification of humankind is effected, and they thus contribute in the highest degree to the establishment, strengthening and manifestation of ecclesial communion; therefore both the sacred ministers and the rest of the Christian faithful must employ the greatest reverence and the necessary diligence in their celebration. (c. 840)

1 In the celebration of the Sacraments in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, the ordained ministers are to use the books approved by the Holy See and the Conference of Bishops of the United States.

2 Cultural sensitivity and adaptations through music and gesture in the celebrations of the sacraments is encouraged. In order to protect the integrity of the sacramental life of the Church and avoid abuses, the adaptations need the approval of the Archbishop. Requests for approval are to be made through the Office of Worship.

3 The ordained ministers may not refuse the sacraments to those who ask for them at appropriate times, are properly disposed and are not prohibited by law from receiving them (c 843, §1)

3.1 All members of the Church have the right to be assisted by their pastors with the spiritual riches of the Church, especially the Word of God and the sacraments. (cf. c. 213) Therefore pastors are responsible for providing the sacraments to all members of the church living in the territory of the parish whether these persons are registered, contributing members of the parish or not.1

1 While parish registration is not a requirement for the reception of sacraments, the parish census should be updated at the time that the sacraments are celebrated, e.g. names of the newly baptized intents added to the list, new registration for the newlywed, etc.

3.2 Ordained ministers are not to create prohibitions of their own that are not already in the Code of Canon Law, the approved liturgical books and laws, and the policies set down by the Archbishop of Santa Fe.

3.3 If one of the Christian faithful is requesting that a sacrament be celebrated after it has already been delayed/refused, the ordained minister that is being asked the second time ought to consult with the one that delayed/refused the first request or with the Dean before the celebration of the sacrament takes place.

3.4 Christian faithful who feel aggrieved by the decision of an ordained minister to delay/refuse a sacrament may have recourse to have their right to the sacraments vindicated a indeed they were violated. (cf. cc. 221; 1400). The minister is to follow the directives given by the competent authority.

3.4.1 If the grievance is against one of the members of the parish staff, not the Pastor, recourse is to be presented to the Pastor.

3.4.2 If the grievance is against the Pastor, or the aggrieved party wants to appeal the decision of 2.4.1., recourse is to be presented to the Dean.

3.4.3 If the grievance is against the Dean, or the aggrieved party wants to appeal the decision of 24.2., recourse is to be presented to the Tribunal Office of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe.

3.4.4 The decision of the Tribunal is ordinarily the final decision. If subsequent appeals ate possible, the aggrieved party will be notified of the procedures.

4 Catholic ministers may not ordinarily administer the sacraments to those who are not in full communion with the Catholic Church; with the exception mentioned in canon 844, §3.2

2 Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist and anointing of the sick to members of the oriental churches which do not have full communion with the Catholic Church, if they ask on their own for the sacraments and are properly disposed. This holds also for members of other churches which in the judgment of the Apostolic See are in the same condition as the oriental churches as far as these sacraments are concerned.

5 Beyond the offerings defined by the Provincial Bishops, the ordained Ministers are  not to ask for further offering for the administration of the sacraments (of. cc. 848, 1264, 1161)3 Care is to be taken that people are not denied the sacraments because they cannot afford the fees. Any appearance in trafficking is to be entirely excluded.

3 Offerings approved by Archbishop Michael J. Sheehan and promulgated on March 11, 1997:
    

 

 

Minimum  (the minister
 may choose to ask nothing)
Suggested (the normal offering 
expected throughout the Archdiocese
Maximum (beyond which no one may ask)
BAPTISM

$0

$10

$20

FUNERAL

$0

$50

$75

WEDDING

$0

$50

$100

MASS INTENTION

$0

$10

$10

6 As a general rule the sacraments are to be celebrated in the parish church or approved chapels or oratories.

7 Sacramental records of the parish are confidential.

7.1 Since sacramental books are official documents of the Church, every effort must be made to keep them neat, and, as far as possible, safe from theft or fire or water damage. File-proof cabinets or safe are recommended.

7.2 While it is a right of the faithful to obtain an authentic copy of the records that affect their status in the Church,4  parish staff is not to allow them to inspect the parish sacramental books since they contain information about others.

4 Canon 487. §2: It is a right of interested parties to obtain personally or through their proxy an authentic written copy or a photocopy of documents which are public by their nature and which pertain to the status of such persons.

7.3 Pastors or Administrators are to see that their staff is properly instructed about the confidentiality of records and that they are sworn to keep secrecy about the information that is found in the parish records.

7.4 In providing baptismal information of those who have been adopted, care must be taken that the natural parents are not revealed unless a court order has been issued in accord with the Statutes of the State of New Mexico.

7.5 Historical records prior to 1900 should be delivered to the chancellor's office for safe keeping in the archives.

7.6 Requests for genealogical research is to be made through the Archdiocesan
Office for Historic-Artistic Patrimony and Archives.

 

BAPTISM

INFANT BAPTISM

From the earliest time, the Church, to which the mission of preaching the gospel and of baptizing was entrusted has baptized children as well as adults. Our Lord said: 'Unless a man is reborn m water and the Holy Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom or God. (John 3:5) The Church has always understood these words to mean that children should not be deprived of baptism, because they are baptized in the faith of the Church. This faith is proclaimed for them by their parents and godparents, who represent both the local Church and the whole society of saints and believers: ‘The Church is at once the mother of all and the mother of each.’ (Saint Augustine, Epistle 98, 5: PL 33, 362.)

Introduction to the Rite of Baptism of Children, No. 2

1 By definition infants are those who have not yet reached the age of reason (7 years old) and cannot have or profess their own faith. (of c. 97, §2; c. 852, §1; Rite of Baptism of Children, No. 1). All others are to be considered miners or adults, and the rites and policies of the RCIA or the RCIC must be followed.

2 The proper liturgical rites approved for the baptism of infants are to be used.

3 Parents are to be encouraged to have their children baptized within the first weeks  after birth, following the prescriptions of universal law. (c, 867, §1)

4 A child of parents who belongs to the Latin church is ascribed to it by reception of baptism, or, if one of the parents does not belong to the Latin church and bath parents agree in choosing that the child be baptized in the Latin Church, the child is ascribed to it by reception of baptism; but if the agreement is lacking, the child is ascribed to the ritual church to which the father belongs (c. 111, Oriental Code canon 29). Notification of the proper rite of the child in inter-ritual baptism is to be made in the baptismal register.

5 In the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, at least one of the names given to the baptized must be a saint’s name. (c.855)

 6 For the licit celebration of infant baptism it is necessary that there be:

 6.1 Consent of at least one of the parents, or the person who lawfully takes their place. (c. 868. §1, 1°)

 6.2 Founded hope that the infant would be brought up in the Catholic religion. If the hope does not exist, the baptism is to be delayed following the prescription s found below (c. 868, §1, 2°).

6.2.1 Baptism is not to be delayed because the parents are not married in the Church.1  Each case must he examined individually. The ordained ministers and those assisting are not to give any indication of forcing the couple to be married before the baptism is celebrated. 2 However some efforts should be made to catechize the parents who are presenting a second, or third, child for baptism and have not done anything to rectify their marital situation.

1 E.g., those who are living together, or were married in a civil ceremony or in the presence of a non-Catholic minister without proper permissions having been obtained.

2 This may constitute enough grounds for a nullity of marriage under force and fear, and/or simulation of consent.

6.2.2 Baptism is not to be delayed because only one of the parents is a practicing Catholic.

6.2.3 Registration or monetary contributions to the Parish Community by envelopes or other means are not to be used as the only factors to determine the parents' practice of the faith.

6.2.4 Baptism may be delayed for a period of time so that the practice of the faith may be encouraged, ordinarily not beyond three months.

6.2.5 The proper persons to present an infant for baptism are the parents. However, the founded hope of raising the infant in the faith could be given by another member of the family as long as the parents allow it and promise not to interfere with the person making the promise in his/her efforts to raise the child in the faith.3

3 Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Pastoralis Actio, Oct. 20th, 1980, No. 28.2: Assurances must be given that this gift will be able so to grow through a genuine education in faith and in Christian living, that the sacrament may attain its full "truth." As a rule, these assurances are to be given by the parents or relatives, although they can be supplied in various ways within the Christian community. If, on the other hand, these assurances are not in reality serious, that fact can be reason for postponing the sacrament. Finally, if it is certain that there are no assurances, the sacrament must be denied.

6.3 Proper instruction of parents and godparents in the meaning of the Sacrament and the obligations which are attached to it. The instructions are to include the scriptural foundation for the sacrament, the sacramental life of the Church, the rite of Baptism.

6.3.1 The requirement of instruction may be fulfilled anywhere in the Archdiocese for those who have a domicile in its jurisdiction. Proof of instructions must be shown.

6.3.2 At the end of the instructions a certificate is to be issued by the parish to those who attended the classes. The certificate is to be signed by the one authorized to give the instructions, dated, and the seal of the perish is to appear an it. This certificate may be lawfully used for a period of two years.

6.3.3 Parents are to be encouraged to prepare for the baptism of the child during pregnancy.

BAPTISM - GENERAL NORMS

Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. (Matthew 28: 19-20a)

1 The right to baptize belongs to the pastor of the home parish in which the adult to be baptized, or in which the parent(s) of the child to be baptized are registered or belong.

2 Baptism is to be celebrated either in the Perish Church or its missions according to the discretion of the Pastor. Baptism is not to be celebrated in private homes. Outside the case of danger of death baptism is not to be celebrated in a hospital or other place. (cc. 857, 860)

3 Outside the case of necessity, it is not lawful for anyone, without the required permission, to confer baptism in the territory of another, not even upon his own subjects. (c. 862),

4 Outside of the case of necessity, it is not lawful for anyone, without the required permission from the proper pastor, to confer baptism in their territory upon those who are not his subjects. In those instances wham permission has been obtained to have someone baptized in another parish, the responsibility for the paper work, catechesis, and the judgment as to whether the baptism should proceed, still remains with the proper pastor unless other arrangements have been explicitly made.

5 Whenever reasonably possible the sacrament of baptism is to be celebrated on Sundays in the presence of the Christian Community, not necessarily in the context of the Sunday Eucharist. Private ceremonies are strongly discouraged unless there is a reasonable cause in the judgment of the pastor of the place of baptism.1

1 Children of unwed parents or of  parents who are in a marriage that cannot be officially recognized by the Church,  ordinarily are not to be baptized within the celebration of the Eucharist.

6 Every parish church shall have a baptistry or at least a prominently located baptismal font, property equipped for the conferring of baptism (c. 858). The font shall be treated with reverence, neatly maintained, and thoroughly cleaned at frequent intervals.

7 Either the rite of immersion, which is more suitable as a symbol of participation In the death and resurrection of Christ, or the rite of infusion may be lawfully used in the celebration of baptism. (Sacred Congregation for Divine Worship, Christian Initiation, General Instruction, 2nd editio typica: 1973. n. 22)

8 The Ordinary minister of the Sacrament is one who has received Sacred Orders. For parishes or communities without an ordained minister, a non-ordained Christian faithful can licitly administer the Sacrament by written permission of the Archbishop (c, 861, §2).

9 The faithful shall be instructed on the meaning and necessity of baptism, especially when the Sunday's Scripture readings lend themselves to the theme, e.g. during Lent, Solemnity of the Baptism of the Lord.

10 Periodically an instruction shall be given in every parish explaining the requirements for the valid administration of baptism and the obligation of a lay person to confer the sacrament in emergency (c. 861, §2). The faithful shall be instructed to report an emergency baptism immediately to the pastor of the person baptized. The pastor will decide if prudent grounds exist for repeating the baptism conditionally.

11 Priest and deacons shall acquaint those who may be concerned, especially doctors, nurses, and parents, including non-Catholics if necessary, with the Church's practice in regard to baptism. This obligation devolves particularly upon hospital chaplains and pastors having hospitals within their parishes. The matter should also be clearly explained to those about to enter into marriage.

12 After an emergency baptism, the proper pastor shall arrange to supply the ceremonies using the proper rite in the approved liturgical books. [Cf #22]

13 Only persons not yet baptized may be baptized. (c. 864)

14 Whenever an adult is seeking baptism, he/she ordinarily is to be prepared through the RCIA process. Children of catechetical age are to be prepared through the RCIC process.2   See Archdiocese of Santa Fe, Infant Baptism Policy, for the preparation required when an infant is being baptized.

2 The sacramental preparation of children of catechetical age can be done through the regular catechism classes offered at the parish, however the rites of the RCIA or RCIC are to be followed.

15 If there is a doubt whether one has been baptized or whether baptism was validly conferred and the doubt remains after serious investigation, baptism is to be conferred conditionally. (c. 889, §1)

15.1 If it is not prejudicial to anyone, to prove conferral of baptism, the declaration of a single witness who is above suspicion suffices or the oath of the baptized person, a the baptism was received at an adult age.3 (c. 876)

3 In this case "adult" is to be interpreted as seven years old or older. unless the person lacks use of reason. (cf. canons 852, 97)

15.2 If there is a question of whether baptism was conferred validly by a non-Catholic community, the rites of the non-Catholic community as well as the intention of an adult baptized person and the minister of the baptism need to be investigated. As a rule of thumb, if water and the Trinitarian formula is used the baptism is conferred validly.4

4 There is not an authentic list of the ecclesial communities whose baptism the Catholic Church does not recognize. The Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments has carefully studied the validity of "mormon" baptism and has grave doubts about its validity. The Diocese of Salt Lake City, as a result, has the policy of conditional baptism of all Mormon converts to the Catholic faith. Since the doubt remains, a dispensation of disparity of worship ad cautelam is given for Mormons wishing to marry a Roman Catholic. Conditional Baptism of Mormons is the policy of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. (9/97)

15.3 If after a serious investigation it seems necessary to confer baptism again conditionally, the minister should explain beforehand the reasons why baptism is conferred conditionally in this instance.

15.4 The celebration of conditional baptism is done privately rather than in a public liturgical assembly of the community. The reception into full communion should take place later at the Sunday Eucharist of the community.

15.5 In conferring conditional baptism the Christian Initiation of Adults on Exceptional Circumstances (Abbreviated form) is to be used, omitting the anointing with the Oil of Catechumens. When administering the sacrament the following formula is used: "N., if you are not baptized, I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." The celebration of the sacrament of confirmation is deferred until the reception into full communion with the Church.

16 If aborted fetuses are alive, they are to be baptized if possible (c. 871). If there is doubt of whether the person or the fetus is alive, baptism can be conferred conditionally. If there is no doubt that the person or fetus is dead, the minister may not baptize.

17 Whenever possible a sponsor is to be employed in the celebration of the sacrament (c. 872).

17.1 Only one male or one female sponsor, or one of each sex is to be employed (c. 837). The law does not allow for two males or two females to be sponsors at baptism.

17.2 To be admitted as a sponsor the following prescriptions must be met (c. 874, § 1):

17.2.1 be designated by the one to be baptized, by the parents or the one who
takes their place or, in their absence, by the pastor or minister and is to have the qualifications and intention of performing this role;

17.2.2 be at least 16 years of age, unless the pastor or minister judges that an exception is to be made for a just cause;

17.2.3 be a Catholic who has been confirmed and has already received the sacrament of the Most Holy Eucharist and leads a life in harmony with the faith and the role to be undertaken;5

5 Care must be taken in the interpretation of "to live a life in harmony with the faith and the role to be undertaken." It should not be interpreted in such a way that only saints would be allowed. If one of the sponsors is in a marriage that cannot be recognized by the Church, due pastoral care most be taken to determine the situations surrounding the case. Under no circumstances are the ministers to use the celebration of the sacrament of baptism as a means to force the godparents to enter into a sacramental marriage. However, in those cases where their marital status can be rectified, they should be encouraged to do so. Some people live a life that is in harmony with the faith and are capable of assuming the office of sponsor even though their marriage cannot be recognized by the Church's law. However, married sponsors should be in a valid marriage.

17.2.4 not be bound by any canonical penalty legitimately imposed or declared;6

6 These are legitimately imposed penalties by a Tribunal of the Church. No priest or deacon may impose their own penalties. Penalties in the Church must be imposed or declared by a judicial process (e.g. excommunications, suspensions, interdicts).

17.2.5 not be the father or the mother of the one to be baptized.

17.3 The prohibition for clergy and religious to be sponsors no longer exists. Those asked to be sponsors are to defer from being the minister of baptism so that the roles are not confused.

18 At the request of the parents and in accordance with the ecumenical guidelines a baptized Christian not in full communion with the Catholic Church may act as Christian witness together with a Catholic sponsor. (cf. c. 874, §2) If a Christian witness was used, proper notification of that fact should be made in the baptismal register.7

7 Because of the close communion between the Catholic Church and the separated Eastern church it is permissible for a just reason to accept one of the faithful of an Eastern Church as godparent along with a Catholic godparent at the baptism of a Catholic infant or adult, as long as the Catholic upbringing of one being baptized is provided for and there is assurance that the person is fit to be a godparent. (Secretariat for Christian Unity, Ecumenical Directory, Part I, May 14, 1967. no. 48)

19 A Catholic, if requested, may act as a Christian witness or sponsor at a non-Catholic baptism.

20 A baptismal sponsor may act through a proxy.

 20.1 In order far a proxy to act validly, he or she must have been appointed the sponsor, not the parents or minister. Proof of appointment must obtained in writing.

20.2 Proof that the sponsor is qualified and willing to accept the office obligation also must be obtained.

20.3 The proxy must have the same qualifications as the sponsor, and the names of both must be recorded.8

8 Instruction of the Sacred Congregation for the Sacraments, Nov. 25, 1925.

21 It is the duty of the pastor to see that as soon as possible the celebration of Baptism is to be recorded in the proper parish book in accord with canon 877, §1.

22 When an emergency baptism has been celebrated in a hospital, or any other place, the following steps are to be followed in order to insure proper recording of the baptism:

22.1 The one who administers baptism (cleric or lay) is to see that, unless a sponsor is present, there be at least a witness by whom the conferral of baptism can be proved. (canon 875)

22.2 If baptism was not administered by the pastor of the territorial parish of the institution, the one who administered baptism must inform the pastor of the territorial parish in which baptism was administered so that the proper record may be entered into the books in accord with the norms of canon 877, §1 (canon 878). This is to be done within three days after the administration of the sacrament.

22.3 The territorial parishes for the following hospitals are:

22.3.1 Lovelace Medical Center, Albuquerque: Holy Ghost Church.

22.3.2 University of New Mexico Hospital, Albuquerque: St. Charles Borromeo.

22.3.3 Presbyterian Hospital, Albuquerque: St. Charles Borromeo.

22.3.4 Kaseman Presbyterian, Albuquerque: Assumption.

22.3.5 Northside Presbyterian, Albuquerque: Risen Savior.

22.3.6 St. Joseph Medical Center. Albuquerque: San Ignacio.

22.3.7 St. Joseph West Mesa, Paradise Hills: St. Jude.

22.3. 8 St. Joseph Northeast Heights, Albuquerque: Queen of Heaven.

22.3.9 Clovis High Plain Hospital, Clovis: Sacred Heart, Clovis.

22.3.10 Española Hospital, Española: Sacred Heart, Española.

22.3.11 North Regional Medical Hospital, Las Vegas: Immaculate Conception.

22.3.12 St. Vincent, Santa Fe: St. John the Baptist.

22.3.13 Public Health Services Indian Hospital, Santa Fe: St John Baptist.

22.3.14 Holy Cross Hospital, Taos: Our Lady of Guadalupe, Taos.

22.4 The one who administers the baptism is to encourage the parents, or person baptized, to go to their proper parish to have the ceremonies supplied.9 A record of the ceremonies supplied is to be sent to the parish where the baptism is recorded (territorial parish of the institution).

9 By proper parish is understood the parish where the parents, or the one baptized, are registered. If they are not registered in any parish, it is understood to be the territorial parish of their home address.

22.5 When Baptism is conferred by a non-cleric, the recording of the baptism is done in accord with the norms of law. Catholic Chaplains are to see that the proper information is sent to the parish.

23 In recording the baptism of a child of an unmarried mother, the name of the mother is to be inserted if there is public proof of her maternity or a she asks this willingly, either in writing or before two witnesses; likewise the name of the father is to be inserted if his paternity has been proved either by some public document or by his own declaration before the pastor and two witnesses; in other cases, the name of the one to be baptized is recorded without any indication of the name the father or the parents. (canon 877, § 92)

Rule of thumb: Place the names that appear on the State birth certificate; if the father is willing to sign a document in the presence of the pastor, should be encourage to do so in the presence of the civil authorities, and informed that when the proper change is made in the State birth certificate that his name will be added to the baptismal certificate.

24 In recording the baptism of an adopted child, the names of the adopting pare are to be recorded. The names of the natural parents are not to be recorded since that is contrary to the norms for the State of New Mexico (c. 877, §3). Please note that, in the case of adoption after baptism, the names of the natural parents should be kept in the baptismal register, and a notation of adoption the new parents' names should be added to the record. Be aware that in the State of New Mexico the names of the natural parents cannot be given out without a court order, even after the adoptee is eighteen years old.10

10 For further information on the State of New Mexico Laws regarding adoption, see New Mexico State Statues. 1978, 1989 Replacement Pamphlet, Chapter 40, Article 7. Special attention to Section 40-7-52 regarding the name of the adoptee, and 40-7-53 regarding confidentiality of records.

25 No changes can be made in the baptismal register, unless there is an authentic document that substantiate the change. The change is to be marked in notations, including the source of the change.

 

CONFIRMAT1ON

Those who have been baptized continue on the path of Christian initiation through the Sacrament of confirmation. In this sacrament they receive the Holy Spirit whom the Lord sent upon the apostles on Pentecost.                                                                                                    (Rite of Confirmation, #1)

 

1 Pastors are to encourage those in their parish who have not received the sacrament of confirmation to receive it.

2 The ordinary age for confirmation in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe is during the High School years.1 The confirmation name must be the name of a saint.

1 The Archbishop of Santa Re, reserves the right to confirm infants (those under the age of 7) in accord with the centenary and immemorial customs established in New Mexico. (c.26). Requests are to be made directly to the Archbishop.

3 Even though it is permissible for a child between the ages of 7 and 16 when baptized, or welcomed into full communion with the Catholic Church, to be confirmed by the presbyter that administers the sacrament of baptism, or welcomes the child into full communion with the Church (Cf. Rites of Christian Initiation of Adults NCCB/USCC #305), this practice, however valid, should be discouraged so as not to subvert the normal confirmation preparation program.

4 Request for the sacrament of confirmation to be celebrated in a parish is made through the Archbishop's Office.

4.1 Confirmation is ordinarily to be celebrated during the Easter Season (Easter to Pentecost).

4.2 If the confirmation is to take place during the Easter Season, the request must be presented in writing by September 1st of the previous year.

4.3 If the confirmation is to take place during the fall (Oct.-Dec.) the request must be presented in writing by April 1.

5 Pastors and parents are to ascertain that the person to be confirmed has chosen freely to receive this sacrament. In the latter stages of preparation each candidate should indicate by letter to the Archbishop, or his designate, his or her desire to receive the sacrament on the occasion offered.

6 Pastors are to make sure that proof of baptism is established for all candidates to be confirmed.

7 Pastors shall urge those to be confirmed to approach the sacraments of Penance prior to the celebration of Confirmation, unless the candidate is a Catechumen.2

2 A catechumen is an unbaptized person. If the person was baptized in another Christian community he/she is not a catechumen.

8 Each candidate to be confirmed shall have an individual sponsor. To be admitted as a sponsor the following prescriptions must be met (canons 893; 874, §1):

8.1 be designated by the one to be confirmed, by the parents or the one who takes their place of, in their absence, by the pastor or minister and is to have the qualifications and intention of performing this role;

8.2 be at least 16 years of age, unless the pastor or minister judges that an exception is to be made for a just cause;

8.3 be a Catholic who has been confirmed and has already received the sacrament of the Most Holy Eucharist and leads a life in harmony with the faith and the role to be undertaken;3

3 Care must be taken in the interpretation of "to live a life in harmony with the faith and the role to be undertaken." It should not be interpreted in such a way that only saints would be allowed. If the sponsor(s) is in a marriage that cannot be recognized by the Church, due pastoral care must be taken to determine the situations surrounding the case. Under no circumstances are the sacred ministers to use the celebration of the sacrament of confirmation as a means to force the sponsor to enter a sacramental marriage. However, in those cases where their marital status can be rectified, they should be encouraged to do so. Some people live a life that is in harmony with the faith and are capable of assuming the office of sponsor even though their marriage cannot be recognized by the Church's Law. However, married sponsors should be in a valid marriage.

8.4 not be bound by any canonical penalty legitimately imposed or declared;4

4 These are legitimately imposed penalties by a Tribunal of the Church. No one may impose their own penalties. Penalties in the Church must be imposed or declared by a judicial process (e.g. excommunications, suspensions, interdicts).

8.5 not be the father or the mother of the one to be confirmed.

9 It is desirable that the one who undertook the role of sponsor at baptism be sponsor for confirmation. (c. 893, 32)

10 A preparation program for candidates for confirmation should ordinarily be offered in parishes each year. A preparation program should be offered at least every second year.

11 A pastor may not present a member of another parish for confirmation without the permission of the proper pastor.

12 Confirmation preparation is one of many opportunities for ongoing faith formation in the life of young people. It is the obligation of parents to see that their children continue to participate in the catechesis and other faith formation offered by the parish throughout their high school years, even after the celebration of confirmation. Confirmation preparation will include the following:

12.1 Prior to entrance into the final preparation period for confirmation, young people should have recently completed at least one year of catechesis or religious formation at the parish or be enrolled in a Catholic high school where they participate in daily theology classes.

12.2 A final period of four to six months of confirmation preparation is held at the local parish for all candidates, including those attending Catholic high schools. This period of preparation in required and is to include orientation, catechesis on the sacrament of confirmation, spiritual and community outreach activities, retreats, and the practical and liturgical arrangements for the celebration.

12.3 Catechesis for high school age Catholics is to include: basic knowledge of the Scriptures and how to use them; an understanding of the sacramental life of the Church; principles of making decisions based on Christian morality; prayer; spiritual enrichment; service to the community, etc.

12.4 The four to six month period of proximate preparation for confirmation will include a number of sessions for parents and sponsors to aid them in their mentoring roles.

13 Whenever possible a parish community is to have a program coordinator who assists the pastor and others in the parish staff in designing and coordinating the program. Proper selection of catechists and other adult leaders is of importance.

14 Those entering into full communion with the Catholic Church, who have been validly confirmed in their church are not to be confirmed again.5

5 At this time we recognize as valid the confirmation administered by presbyters or bishops of the Orthodox Churches. Anglican, Episcopalian, Lutheran, or other non-Orthodox confirmations are not recognized as valid. When in doubt call the Catholic Center.

15 No fee or offering in connection with the administration of confirmation may be required from those who are to be confirmed or from their parents or sponsors.

16 The following norms apply to the faculty of the pastor, parochial vicar or the presbyter who legitimately takes their place, to confirm6

6 Other presbyters need explicit delegation from the Archbishop for the validity of the sacrament. Please note that the same priest who baptizes, or welcomes someone into full communion with the Church, is the one that enjoys the faculty to confirm. The two actions must be celebrated by the same priest, otherwise the confirmation is invalid.

16.1 The minister described above who baptizes one who is no longer an infant, has by universal law the faculty to confirm. (cf. cc, 852, 866, 883, § 2°)

16.2 The minister described above who receives into full communion one who is no longer an infant and was baptized in a non-Catholic community, employs by universal law the faculty to confirm (c. 883, § 2°).

16.3 The minister described above who readmits to full communion with the Catholic Church, baptized Catholics who have apostatized from the faith and are not confirmed, enjoys by universal law the faculty to confirm. (c. 883, § 2°, and Pontifical Commission for the Interpretation of the Decrees of Vatican Council II, reply of April 25th, 1975: AAS 67(1075), 348.)

16.4 The minister described above who readmits to full communion a baptized Catholic who has been instructed in or adhered to a non-Catholic religion, without fault of their own, enjoys by universal law the faculty to confirm (cf. c. 883, § 2°; and Pontifical Commission for the Interpretation of the Decrees of the Vatican Council II, reply of December 21st, 1979: AAS 72(1980), 105).

17 If a priest wishes to confirm a Catholic baptized as an infant, that was not raised in the Catholic Church or any other religion and has not been confirmed, must request faculties in writing from the Archbishop, When requesting faculties the full name of the candidate(s) for confirmation and the reasons for the request are to be clearly stated. To confirm in these cases without the express faculty granted by the Archbishop renders the sacrament invalid. 7

7 The Archbishop may choose to grant general faculties for such cases for the Easter Vigil and if  so will send such a letter to the priests at the the beginning of the Lenten season.

18 Any presbyter may confirm in case of danger of death (c. 883, § 3°).

19 Deacons may not confirm under any circumstances.

20 In preparing the liturgical celebration the directives of the proper liturgical books are to be followed.

21 As soon as possible the pastor is to see that the proper information is entered into the parish register of confirmation. The following information must be entered:

21.1 Name of the confirmed.

21.2 Name of parents.

21.3 Name of sponsors,

21.4 Name of the minister.

21.5 Date and place of conferral of confirmation,

22 The pastor is also to see that the proper information is sent to the parish of baptism so that the proper entry be made in the baptismal register in accord with the norms of canon 535, §2 (cf. c. 895)

EUCHARIST

The Most Holy Eucharist is the most august sacrament, in which Christ me Lord himself is contained, offered and received, and by which the Church constantly lives and grows. (c. 897)

MINISTERS

1 The minister, who in the person of Christ confects the sacrament of the Eucharist, is solely a validly ordained priest (c. 900)

2 When a just cause requires it, priests in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe are allowed to celebrate Eucharist twice a day and three times on Sundays and holy days of obligation. (c. 905, §2).

1 The Congregation for Divine worship and Discipline of the Sacraments in a letter dated January 9, I991, indicates that the diocesan bishop, and he alone, "by reason of canon 87, §1, in particular cases (c. 85), for just and reasonable cause (c. 90, §1), for the spiritual good of the faithful (c. 87, §1) can grant his priests the permission to celebrate three Masses on weekdays and four Masses on Sundays.

3 The celebration of the Eucharist is to be done in accord with the approved liturgical books for the United States. The 1962 Ordo Missae may be celebrated in parishes that have obtained the proper permissions and with the restrictions placed by the Archbishop at the time of granting the permission.

4 The ordinary minister for the distribution of the Eucharist is a bishop, priest, or deacon (c. 910, §1).

5 The extraordinary minister for the distribution of the Eucharist is a properly instructed and commissioned lay person.

5.1 Extraordinary ministers of the Eucharist can be male or female (c. 230, §3). These ministers are appointed for a given pariah community to aid in the distribution of the Eucharist in Mass and to the shut-in. They are not to function apart from their parish community.

5.2 In order for a person to be appointed as a Eucharistic minister, the following conditions must be met:

5.2.1 Be a Catholic in good standing who is able to receive the Eucharist.

5.2.2 Except for special Masses, be at least eighteen years of or confirmed.

5.2.3 Be chosen by the pastor and appointed by him for the parish community entrusted to him. This appointment is to be for period not to exceed three years. Before he/she begins to exercise the office, he/she must be property instructed 2 and commissioned by the pastor, or delegate, at a Sunday Eucharist.

2 The ministers are to be instructed in the following: the proper reverence due to the Eucharist; the manner to conduct oneself during the Eucharistic celebration; distribution of the Eucharist under both species; distribution to the infirm at their home or hospitals: what is to be done in case the consecrated bread is dropped, or the consecrated wine spilled.

5.3 Whenever the situation requites it, the presider of the Eucharistic liturgy can call upon members of the faithful who are not eucharistic ministers to aid him in the distribution on that one occasion. Those called must fulfill the requirements of 5.2.1.

5.4 The lay ministers of the Eucharist are not ordinarily to be involved in a celebration when there are sufficient ordinary ministers present, whether the ordinary ministers are vested or not.3

3 Pontifical Commission for the Authentic Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law, February 20, 1987, approved by John Paul II on June 15, 1987.

5.5 The normal attire of the lay Eucharistic minister is lay clothes which are appropriate for the ministry. They are not to wear albs or stoles, or any other insignia that may lead others to believe that they are ordained ministers. They may wear a cross or other Eucharistic symbol which is to be worn over lay clothing.

5.6 Ordinarily the lay ministers are to be seated in the pews with other members of the assembly. They are to approach the altar at the time of the breaking of the bread.

5.7 Lay Eucharistic ministers who are taking the Eucharist to the homebound or to those in hospitals are to present the Eucharist in a prayerful manner. They are not to make judgment regarding the suitability of the person to receive the Eucharist; such concerns are to be referred to the pastor.

CELEBRATION OF THE EUCHARIST

6 The Eucharist must be celebrated with unleavened bread and wine.

6.1 The bread must be made of wheat alone. Those parishes that wish to bake their own bread for special occasions must bake bread that is composed of wheat flour and water and no other additives.

6.2 The wine must be natural grape wine and not corrupt.

6.3 Only those priests who have received special faculties from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, or the Congregation for Divine Worship and Sacraments, may validly use natural grape juice for the celebration of the Eucharist.4

4 Priests who received permission from the Archbishop to use natural grape juice prior to September of 1983 may validly continue to do so.

7 The celebration of the Eucharist may take place any day and at any hour, except for those times excluded by the liturgical norms (c. 931)

7.1 On Holy Thursday, all Masses without the participation of the people are forbidden (Roman Missal, Mass of the Lord's Supper)

7.2 The Mass of the Lord's Supper (Holy Thursday) is celebrated in evening, at a time that is convenient for the full participation of the whole local community. All priests may concelebrate, even if on that day they have concelebrated the Chrism Mass or if, for the good of the faithful they must celebrate another Mass. (Congregation for Divine Worship, Circular letter Concerning the Preparation and Celebration of The Feasts, January 16, 1988 [EASTER] n. 46)

7.3 On Holy Thursday, where pastoral considerations require it, the local Ordinary may permit another Mass to be celebrated in churches and oratories in the evening, and in the case of true necessity, even in the morning, but only for those faithful who cannot otherwise participate in the evening Mass. Care should nevertheless be taken to ensure that celebrations of this kind do not take place for the benefit of individual persons or of small groups, and that they are not to the detriment of the main Mass (EASTER, n.47)

7.3.1 A second evening Mass is permitted in mission churches if in the judgment of the pastor there is a true necessity, or it is advantageous for the people.

7.3.2 The solemn adoration before the Blessed Sacrament is to end at midnight.

7.4 On Good Friday, in accordance with ancient tradition, the Church does not celebrate the Eucharist (EASTER, n. 59)

7.5 On Holy Saturday the, Church abstains strictly from the celebration of the sacrifice of the Eucharist. (EASTER, n.75)

7.6 Celebration for private groups on Sundays and Holydays of obligation is discouraged.

8 A priest may not celebrate the Eucharist without the participation of at least some members of the faithful, except for a just and reasonable cause (c. 906)

8.1 If a sick or aged priest is unable to stand he may celebrate the Eucharistic Sacrifice while seated, observing the liturgical laws, with the people present (c. 930, §1)

9 In celebrating the Eucharist priests are to wear alb, stole and chasuble of the color of the day as prescribed in the liturgical books. In concelebrations, the concelebrating priests may wear alb and stole of the proper liturgical color. The presider is to be fully vested. It is not proper for priests to wear the stole over a cassock, religious habit or secular clothes.  It is not proper for those who are not bishops to wear a pectoral cross.5

5 When a bishop wears a pectoral cross he is to wear it under the chasuble or cope. (Ceremonial of Bishops n. 61)

10 When assisting at the celebration of the Eucharist, deacons are to wear an alb, stole, and dalmatic. If the parish community does not have dalmatics, the deacon may wear alb and stole. It is not proper to wear the stole over a cassock, religious habit, or secular clothing. Deacons are not to wear a cross when they are vested.

11 The celebration of the Eucharist is to take place in a sacred place, unless in a particular case necessity demands otherwise; in such a case it must be done in a respectable place (c. 932).

11.1 For the regular celebration of the Eucharist in private chapels, permission is needed from the Archbishop (c. 1228).

11.2 Ordinarily the Eucharist may be celebrated in private homes; however this is not to be done on Sundays or Holy Days of obligation or in conjunction with the celebration of the Sacraments of Initiation, or Marriage.

12 The Eucharist is to be celebrated upon a dedicated or blessed altar; a suitable table can be used outside of a sacred place, but always retaining the use of cloth and corporal (c. 932, §2)

13 Priests may concelebrate at any celebration of the Eucharist in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, unless the welfare of the faithful urges otherwise or the Archbishop has judged that the concelebration is not appropriate for that occasion.

13.1 No priest may be admitted to concelebrate once the celebration of the Eucharist has begun (General Instructions #156)

13.2 It is forbidden for Catholic priests to concelebrate the Eucharist with priests or ministers of churches or ecclesial communities which are not in full communion with the Catholic Church (c. 908)

13.3 The number of concelebrants that gather around the altar should be in keeping with the dignity of the Eucharistic celebration and the size of the sanctuary.

13.4 In the recitation of the Eucharistic Prayer the concelebrants are to say the words of the prayer inaudibly, so that the presider's voice can be heard. (General Instructions #170)

13.5 Concelebrants are to recite only those parts of the Eucharistic Prayer that are designated for all concelebrants (namely the epiclesis, words of institution, anamnesis, and post-consecratory epiclesis). The parts designated for the presider, or for one of the concelebrants, should be recited by one priest only.

13.6 When the sacred species are presented prior to communion, the presider is the only one who elevates the consecrated bread to be presented while the words "This is the Lamb of God" are being recited. During this time the concelebrants hold the consecrated bread without elevating it.

14 Deacons are not celebrants of the Eucharist; they assist the bishop and priests at the altar. At the celebration of the Eucharist the deacon has his own functions: he proclaims the gospel, sometimes preaches God's word, leads the general intercessions, assists the priest, gives communion to the people (in particular ministering the chalice), and sometimes gives direction about the assembly's moving, standing, kneeling, or sitting. (Cf. General Instructions #61).

14.1 During the Entrance Procession the Deacon carries the Book of the Gospel.6

6 In the entrance procession only one book is to be carried The Book of the Gospels (Evangelary) is carried by a priest or a deacon. If the gospel book is not carried, a lector may carry the Lectionary. The Sacramentary is not to be carried in the procession.

14.2 The deacon together with the priest venerates the altar with a kiss. If incense is used, the deacon assists the presider in incensing the altar.

14.3 Before the reading of the Gospel the deacon asks for the blessing of the presider. This blessing is asked after the censer is prepared and before the Book of the Gospel is taken from the altar.7

7 When the Archbishop presides at the Liturgy, the deacon takes the gospel book to him to be kissed. In liturgy presided by a priest the deacon either takes the book to the priest to be kissed or kisses it himself.

14.4 After the presider introduces the general intercessions, it is desirable that the deacon announce the intentions, but others may. The presider concludes the intercessions.

14.5 At the presentation of the gifts, the deacon prepares the altar and assists the presider in receiving the gifts. if incense is used, the deacon assists the priest with the incensing of the gifts and the altar; afterward he incenses the presider and the people.

14.6 During the Eucharistic Prayer the deacon stands near the altar, but does not mouth the words or make any gestures that might indicate that he is concelebrating. The deacon does not invite the people to proclaim the mystery of faith.8

Sacred Congregation of the Sacraments and Divine Worship January 11, 1983.

14.7 The deacon assists the priest in elevating the consecrated species during the doxology by holding the chalice.

14.8 After the prayer for peace and greeting, the deacon invites the people to exchange the sign of peace.

14.9 After communion the deacon dears the altar and purifies the vessels. The purification of the vessels is to take place either at a side table or after Mass.

14.10 Deacons may make the announcements after the post communion prayer, unless the priest prefers to do so himself.

14.11 If one of the solemn blessings is being used by the presider, the deacon invites the faithful to bow their heads and pray for God's blessing.

14.12 After the final blessing the deacon dismisses the people.

14.13 The deacon together with the presider kisses the altar, makes the proper reverences, and leaves the altar in the same order of the entrance procession, but does not carry out the Book of the Gospels.

15 Ordinarily only the deacons assisting at the altar are to be vested during the celebration of the Eucharist On those occasions when the deacons are vested as an order, 9  they do not gather around the altar for the Eucharistic prayer, but remain at their place following the proper posture of the laity. Ordinarily when tile deacons are vested as an order, they are seated together but not accompanied by their wives.

9 Gathering of the Archdiocesan Clergy; Liturgy of Ordination of Deacons; Funerals of Deacons.

16 For the sake of uniformity in movement and posture during the celebration, the faithful should follow the directions given by the deacons, the presider, the master of ceremonies or another minister. At every celebration of the Eucharist the following posture is to be observed:10

10 In observing these postures, the size of the Church and the environment should be considered. Kneeling should not be required in places where there are no kneelers.

16.1 The people should stand during from the beginning of the entrance song or when the priest enters until the end of the opening prayer; for the singing of the Alleluia before the gospel; while the gospel is being proclaimed; during the profession of faith and the general intercessions, from the prayers over the gifts to the end of the Sanctus; from the Great Amen to the end of the Lamb of God; while receiving Eucharist; for the prayer after communion; for the final blessing and dismissal.

16.2 The faithful should sit during the readings before the gospel and during the responsorial psalm; for the homily and the presentations of the gifts; during the period of silence, or meditation sang, after communion.

16.3 Ordinarily the faithful should kneel from the end of the Sanctus to the end of the Great Amen; during the preparation to receive Eucharist, from the end of the Lamb of God to the presentation of the body and blood of the Lord. Exceptions should be referred to the Archdiocesan Liturgical Commission.

PARTICIPATION IN THE EUCHARIST

17 Any baptized person who is not prohibited by law can and must be admitted to Holy Communion (c. 912). The Guidelines prepared by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops shall be noted.11

11 Canon 844 §1. Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments to Catholic members of the Christian faithful only and likewise, the latter may licitly receive the sacraments only from Catholic ministers with due regard for §§ 2. 3. and 4 of this canon, and canon 861, §2.  Whenever necessity requires or genuine spiritual advantage suggests, and provided that the danger of error or indifferentism is avoided, It is lawful for the faithful for whom it is physically or morally impossible to approach a Catholic minister, to receive the sacraments of penance, Eucharist and anointing of the sick from non-Catholic ministers in whose churches these sacraments are valid. §3. Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist and anointing of the sick to members of the oriental churches which do not have full communion with the Catholic Church, if they ask on their own for the sacraments and are properly disposed. This holds also for members of other churches which in the judgment of the Apostolic See are in the same condition as the oriental churches as far as these sacraments are concerned . §4.   If the danger of death is present or other grave necessity, in the judgment of the diocesan bishop or the conference of bishops, Catholic ministers may licitly administer these sacraments to other Christians who do not have full communion with the Catholic Church, who cannot approach a minister of their own community and on their own ask for it provided they manliest Catholic faith in these sacraments and are property disposed. § 5.  For the cases in §§ 2, 3, and 4, neither the diocesan bishop nor the conference of bishops is to enact general norms except after consultation with at least the local competent authority of the interested non-Catholic Church or community.

18 It is highly recommended that the faithful receive Holy Communion during the celebration of the Eucharist itself12, but it should be administered outside Mass to those who request it for a just cause, the liturgical rites being observed. (c. 918)

12 Ordinarily enough hosts should be consecrated at each Mass for the distribution of the Eucharist at that one Mass. The practice to use hosts consecrated at a previous Mass is discouraged.

19 One who is to receive the Holy Eucharist is to abstain from any food or drink, with the exception of only water and medicine, for at !east one hour before Holy Communion. A priest who celebrates the Eucharist two or three times on the same day may take something before the second or third celebration even if a period of one hour does not intervene. Those persons who are advanced in age or who suffer from an infirmity, as well as those who take care of them, may receive the Eucharist even they have taken something during the previous hour. (c. 919)

20 Communion may be distributed either under the form of bread alone or under the form of bread and wine, the latter practice being preferred.

20.1 Communion may be received in the hand or on the tongue. The option is left up to the person who is receiving, not to the minister who is distributing. The faithful are not permitted to pick up the consecrated bread, or to pass a around to other members.

20.2 In distribution of the Eucharist under bath species the norms given in the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (SC Divine Worship, March 27th, 1975) numbers 241-252 are to be used.

20.2.1 Parishes that distribute Communion under both species should regularly explain to the faithful the proper manner of receiving.

20.2.2 If Communion is distributed by using the rite of intinction, the minister is the one who dips the consecrated bread into the consecrated wine and gives it to the communicant The communicant is not allowed to dip the host into the chalice.

20.2.3 The preferable rite to be used in the Archdiocese of Santa Fe is the reception of Communion directly from the chalice.

21 When a priest is not available for the celebration of the Eucharist, Communion may be distributed in a special service using previously consecrated hosts.

21.1 The ordinary minister for these services is a deacon. Extraordinary ministers of the Eucharist may be deputed by the pastor or Archbishop to lead the people in prayer.

21.2 The proper ritual approved by the Conference of Bishops for celebrations when a priest is not present is to be used.

22 Communion may be taken to the sick and homebound any day or time of the day,13  with the following exceptions:

13 The norms given in 36 are to be followed.

22.1 On Good Friday, Holy Communion may be distributed to the faithful during the celebration of the Lord's Passion alone, though a may be brought at any time of the day to the sick who cannot take part in the celebration.

22.2 On Holy Saturday, Holy Communion may only be given in the form of Viaticum.

23 A person who has received the Eucharist during the day may receive it a second time the same day only if the person participates in the celebration of the Eucharist.14 Those who are in danger of death are strongly urged to receive again even a they have received Communion in the same day (c. 921, §2)

14 Canon 917 and Pontifical Commission for the Authentic Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law, June 26, 1984.

 

PARTICIPATION IN THE HOLY EUCHARIST FOR THE FIRST TIME

24 For the administration of the Eucharist to children, a is required that they have sufficient knowledge and careful preparation so that they can understand the mystery of Christ according to their capacity, and can receive the Lord with faith and devotion. (c. 913, §1)

25 It is the responsibility of parents and those who take the place of parents as well as the pastor to see that children who have reached the use of reason are correctly prepared for the Eucharist as early as the third grade. First reception of the Eucharist is to be preceded by the reception of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. (c. 914)

26 The first celebration of the sacraments of Reconciliation and Eucharist for all children will ordinarily take place in the third grade. A period of approximately three months shall separate the celebration of First Reconciliation from First Eucharist.15

15 Older children should be prepared for the Sacraments of Initiation through the RCIC process.

27 It is the responsibility of parishes to provide programs for all children and parents preparing for the celebration of First Reconciliation and First Eucharist.16

16 If the parents have gone through similar instructions within the last two years, they do not need to repeat the instructions again.

28 Children who have completed programs of preparation for First Reconciliation and First Eucharist in Catholic Schools, are not required to participate in sacramental preparation classes in their home parish programs before the sacraments are celebrated.

28.1 The Catholic school is also responsible for the parent's preparation program.

28.2 A certificate, indicating that preparation far the sacraments has been provided at the school and that the child and parents have completed the program of preparation, will be issued to the parents by the school principal. This certificate is to be presented by the parents to the pastor of the child's home parish. The pastor is to accept this certificate as proof of preparation.

28.3 Ordinarily, the celebrations of First Reconciliation and First Eucharist should occur in the child's home parish. In special circumstances, permission may be granted (in writing) by the pastor of the home parish for the celebration to take place elsewhere.17

17 Children attending a Catholic school in a parish other than their own proper parish should have the option of receiving First Eucharist with their classmates.

29 Ordinarily children of catechetical age who ate not baptized are to be prepared in such a way that they will receive the Sacrament of Baptism and Holy Eucharist in the same celebration.

30 Whenever possible, adults who have not received the Eucharist for the first time should be prepared for the reception of the sacrament through the RCIA process.

31 Whenever possible, First Eucharist should be received under both species following the norms given above.18

18 See 20 above.

RESERVATION OF THE HOLY EUCHARIST

32 The Eucharist must be reserved in the cathedral church and all parish churches of the Archdiocese, and in churches or oratories attached to a canonically erected house of a religious institute or society of apostolic life (c. 934, §1,1°)

33 The Eucharist may be reserved in other churches, oratories, or chapels with the permission of the Archbishop. This permission must be obtained in writing. (c. 934, §1, 2°)

34 The Eucharist may be reserved in any rectory where there is a resident priest. However, the Eucharist may not be reserved in private homes or residences, even those of priests or religious without the written consent of the Archbishop.

35 In places where the Eucharist is reserved, insofar as it is possible, a priest is to celebrate Mass there at least twice a month. (c. 934, §2)

36 It is not licit to keep the Eucharist on one's person or to carry it on a journey unless there is a pastoral need. (c. 935)

36.1 When taking Communion to the sick, the minister carries the Eucharist in a pyx or other suitable receptacle.

36.2 The minister is to make arrangements with the parish and the sick person so that the minister is able to take the Eucharist from the parish or church immediately before going to visit the infirm.

36.3 It is strictly forbidden to take care of personal business (shopping, bank, restaurants, etc...) while carrying the Eucharist.

36.4 If after completing the visitation(s) some consecrated hosts remain, the minister is to consume the hosts before beginning the return trip. If too many hosts are left for consumption, the minister is to take the remaining hosts back to the parish church immediately.

36.5 Whenever possible, the Eucharistic ministers who will be taking the consecrated hosts to the homebound are to be called forth at Mass by the presider after the Communion of the faithful. These ministers then are to be dismissed to take the Eucharist to the sick. The prescriptions of 36.2 are to be observed.

36.6 Whenever a communicant asks for extra consecrated hosts to be taken to others, the Eucharist is not to be given. unless the communicant is a Eucharistic minister known to the one who is distributing.

37 Unless a grave reason prevents it, the church in which the Eucharist is reserved should be open to the faithful for at least some hours each day providing time for prayer before the Blessed Sacrament (c. 937)

38 The Eucharist is to be reserved in only one tabernacle of a church or oratory (canon 938).

38.1 Ordinarily, the Blessed Sacrament is to be reserved in a special chapel that is separate from the body of the Church.19 The tabernacle should be placed in a prominent, conspicuous, beautifully decorated place, that is suitable for prayer (c. 938, §2).

19 If the tabernacle cannot be placed in a separate chapel, ordinarily it should be placed in such a way that the presider does not have his back to it during the celebration of the Eucharist.

38.2 For safety purposes, the Blessed Sacrament may be reserved in a safer, but appropriate place, especially during the night.

38.3 The tabernacle is to be immovable, made of solid opaque material, and locked so that the danger of profanation may be entirely avoided. Clear glass tabernacles are not allowed.

38.4 The key to the tabernacle it to be kept in a safe place.

38.5 A special lamp designating and honoring the presence of Christ is to burn at all times before the tabernacle in which the Eucharist is reserved.

 

EXPOSITION AND VENERATION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

39 It is recommended that in all churches where the Blessed Sacrament is reserved there be exposition of the Sacrament either with the ciborium or with the monstrance, at least occasionally, observing the norms prescribed in the liturgical books.20

20 "I strongly encourage all our parish churches to initiate or to continue the venerable practice of exposition of the Blessed Sacrament on first Friday of every month, as well as on the feast of Corpus Christi." Archbishop Robert F. Sanchez, Pan de Vida A pastoral letter on the Eucharist, June 2, 1991.

40 The minister of exposition and benediction with the Blessed Sacrament is a priest or deacon.

41 Lay Eucharistic ministers, who are deputed for this purpose, may expose and repose the Blessed Sacrament, but may not give the benediction.

42 It is recommended that on the feast of the Body and Blood of Christ, a public witness of veneration of the Eucharist be given by means of a procession through the public streets near the parish church. When it is required the proper permission from the civil authorities should be obtained.

43 Parishes that wish to establish perpetual adoration of the Eucharist or similar practices in a permanent way need the permission of the Archbishop. This request for permission is to be in writing stating the way in which the adoration is to be conducted.

44 Proper catechesis is to be given to the faithful regarding veneration of the Eucharist outside of Mass, so that those who participate may benefit.

 

STIPENDS RECEIVED FOR THE CELEBRATION OF THE EUCHARIST

45 According to the practice of the Church a is lawful to accept offerings to apply the Mass for a definitive intention. (c. 945). However, a priest may not ask for more than the amount determined by the Bishops of the Province. 21

21 At the present time the approved amount is $10.

46 Any appearance of trafficking or commerce is to be entirely excluded from Mass offerings (c. 947). Intentions cannot be denied because the person is unable to make a monetary offering.

47 A priest who celebrates Mass more than once a day or celebrates a Mass with multiple intentions may offer the Mass for the different intentions, but may retain the offering for only one intention.22

22 A priest may only take the equivalent of one intention ($10) on those occasions such as All Souls Day, November 2nd)  when multiple offerings are made by the faithful.

48 On Christmas day, the presider may keep stipends for all the Masses he celebrates. Concelebrants are entitled to only one stipend. (cf. canon 951).

49 The excess stipends from binations, trinations, or multiple-intentioned Masses are to be remitted to the Seminarian Education Fund every month in care of the Archdiocesan Finance Office. If, however, there is urgent financial need in the parish, the excess stipend, or a part of it, may be applied to the general administration of the parish with the prior approval of the Archbishop.23

23 In accord with a decree from the commission for the Authentic Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law, religious priests who are pastors, parochial vicars, parochial administrators, or hold a similar office, are to send the excess stipends to the purpose determined by the Archbishop. Those who are not canonically assigned (priest in a monastery, or resident without assignment in the Archdiocese) are to send the excess stipends to the purposes determined by their religious superior. (August 6, 1987)

50 Every parish community and institution in the Archdiocese that accepts Mass stipends is to keep a careful record of the intentions received. In this book the following information is to be kept: number of Masses to be celebrated, the intention to be celebrated, the stipend given for the celebration, and whether the intention has been fulfilled or not.

51 No one is allowed to accept more intentions that he can fulfill within a year. Anyone who has more intentions that he can fulfill within a year, is to send the intentions to the Chancellor for distribution to priests who receive no intentions.

Return to Office of Worship

Return to ASF Home Page

    Enter doors to return to site map

              

Copyright © 1997 Archdiocese of Santa Fe
Contact the Archdiocese: chancellor@archdiocesesantafe.org
Webmaster:
  mrc@archdiocesesantafe.org